Dingo the Dissident

THE BLOG OF DISQUIET : Qweir Notions in the Armpit of Diogenes by DINGO the DISSIDENT binge-thinker since February 2008.
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Sunday, 23 November 2008

Understanding Capitalism

Keep on dividing and ruling.
First: corral people into Nationalities.
Then divide them into Nuclear Families.
Then divide the families
into frustrated, infantilised,
isolated Individuals.
Then sell them everything
except what you have taken from them:
connection
(and ultimately the world).
And for those who will not buy your trash:
correction.

2 comments:

Wofl said...

The origins of capitalism might be said to go as far back as the damming of the river Garonne below Toulouse in 1180, when natural human co-operativeness led to the financing of dams and the subsequent water-mills (for the milling of the flour from the Tolosian Plain) by several parties, with a proportional sharing of a percentage of the profits.
This, however, did not involve Usury (a mortal sin), which was, until the rise of banker-families like the Medici of Florence, forced upon Jews. Whether the Knights Templar were involved in Usury or not is a difficult question. They certainly lent money, but not necessarily at Interest (which is the definition of usury).
It is also unclear whether or not rich Cathars (who, like the Protestants who succeeded them, pretty well cornered the weaving trades) lent money to each other at Interest...

Wofl said...

I have not yet read: SICARD, GERMAIN
Aux origines des sociétés anonymes Les moulins de Toulouse au Moyen Âge.